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Animal & Plant Health Protection
Plant Health

Nebraska Buffer Strip Program

link icon Program Information for New Applications

The Nebraska Buffer Strip Program was implemented in January 1999 through fees assessed on registered pesticides. Cropland adjacent to perennial and seasonal streams, ponds, and wetlands can be enrolled in buffer strips, which are designed to filter agrichemicals such as fertilizers and pesticides. Two kinds of buffer strips are eligible - filter strips, which are narrow strips of grass; and riparian forest buffer strips containing trees and grass. The minimum widths are 20 and 55 feet, respectively; the maximum widths are 120 and 180 feet, respectively.

The program is designed to be used in conjunction with the USDA Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP), or other programs, however it can be used by itself, as well. Rental rates are calculated as follows:

Additional information can be found on the APPLICATION FORM (PDF or EXCEL). Interested landowners should contact their local Natural Resources District or USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service office to begin the application process.

Resources for NRCS and NRD personnel: Hydrologic Unit (HUC) Classification from 1998 Unified Watershed Assessment.

Please refer to the Program Summary for a recent update on acres enrolled and incentives provided statewide, as well as the following maps.

link icon Buffer Strip Distribution
link icon County Totals - Total Acres
link icon County Totals - Forested Buffer Acres
link icon County Totals - Irrigated Acres
link icon County Totals - Contracts

More Information About Buffer Strips

link icon Nebraska Buffer Strip Act
link icon Nebraska Buffer Strip Regulations
link icon Conservation Buffers: Design Guidelines for Buffers, Corridors, and Greenways
link icon Conservation Buffers to Reduce Pesticide Losses (NRCS)
link icon Conservation Technology Information Center
link icon Great Before/After Photos in Iowa
(See the following research article for more information on this project)
link icon Watershed restoration and agricultural practices in the midwest: Bear Creek in Iowa. Isenhart, T.M.; J.D. Colletti, and R.C. Shultz, 1997. In J.E. Williams (ED) Watershed Restoration: Principles and practices. American Fisheries Society. Beltsville, MD.
link icon Riparian Forest Buffers (National Agroforestry Center)
link icon USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Buffer Strips: Common Sense Conservation
link icon Realizing the Promise of Conservation Buffer Technology

Related Links

link icon Arbor Day Foundation, Conservation Trees Pamphlet
link icon Association for Temperate Agroforestry
link icon Conservation Trees for Nebraska
link icon EPA River Corridor and Wetland Restoration
link icon EPA Watershed Academy
link icon Fact Sheets: Functions and Values of Riparian Areas
link icon Iowa State University Photo Gallery
link icon NDA Water Resources Protection
link icon Nebraska Pesticide and Noxious Weed Newsletter
link icon NRCS Stream Corridor Restoration
link icon NRCS Stream Visual Assessment Protocol
link icon Riparian Areas: Functions and Strategies for Management
link icon Riparian Management Systems - Sustaining Agriculture and Environment
link icon USDA Food and Agricultural Policy "Taking Stock for the New Century" (Sept. 2001)
link icon USDA NRCS Photo Gallery
link icon USDA Water Quality Information Center
Files in PDF format can be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader

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